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Silver Buttons

Bob Graham

Walker Books, $27.95

THIS picture book begins with Jodie studiously finishing off a drawing of a duck wearing a top hat, adding the final flourish at exactly 9.59 on a Thursday morning, which happens to be the same time that her little brother Jonathan pushes “slowly to his feet”, and takes his first wonky steps.

Mum’s in the kitchen learning how to play the tin whistle, while outside, the world prepares for another day; there’s people jogging, an ambulance whizzes by, a soldier says goodbye to his mum, a homeless woman pushes a shopping cart full of her belongings and Joseph Pascano avoids the cracks in the path so the sharks won’t get him. The ripples grow ever wider, as readers get aerial views of Jodie’s house, street, neighbourhood, and finally, the city. But Silver Buttons is not about geography, it’s about the small moments that make up our day, the ordinary and the extraordinary, the ones that go unnoticed, but happen anyway, and the one’s that only come around once.

A UNICEF Bologna Illustrator of the Year winner, Graham’s illustrations are humming with energy, warmth and humour. Every page delivers another layer to the story, making this a thoughtful reading experience for adults and children alike. I’ve always loved Graham’s characters and their environments; kitchens are crowded (not a gleaming bench in sight), dogs are scruffy, gender lines are blurred (Dad often wears the apron), different cultures are represented, and there is a strong suggestion that everyone has interesting internal lives. His characters are relatable, compassionate, relaxed, and engaged with the world.

Silver Buttons isn’t only an outstanding picture book, it’s also a subtle, non preachy, reminder to look beyond our own front door and seek a connection to something bigger.

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