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Mr Chicken Lands on London

Leigh Hobbs

Allen&Unwin, $24.95

How to describe the indescribable Mr Chicken? He’s impulsive,doesn’t make friends easily, but he’s always ready to lend a hand. He loves breakfast in bed, facts and figures and, above all, travelling. In 2009 Mr Chicken went to Paris to visit his French friend Yvette, now it’s London’s turn. Seeing Old Blighty through such inquisitive eyes reveals a city few have seen

Mr Chicken’s entrance befits his unique personality. No economy seating this time around – no, no – Mr Chicken arrives by parachute, causing barely a ripple in the middle of the Thames, just near Waterloo Bridge.

After checking into his suite at the Savoy Hotel, he devours a full English breakfast before taking in the sites, Mr Chicken-style. There’s a visit to Buckingham Palace, where a special flag is raised in his honour, St Paul’s Cathedral, Trafalgar Square and the National Gallery. When he’s not squeezing his formidable bulk into a double decker bus, he’s filling up an entire carriage on the London Eye or blithely blocking commuters on the Tube.

And Mr Chicken enjoys his mealtimes – each and every one of them. Central to the humour is the fact that no one is even the slightest bit perturbed by the sight of a very large chicken (with incisors) traipsing around the city.

The illustrations are intricate, frenetic and full of wry humour, with each of Mr Chicken’s foibles captured with economy and flair. Every mark on the page means something; every flourish and stroke either builds character, points to a visual gag, or adds another layer to the story.

If you enjoy the work of Quentin Blake, Tomi Ungerer or Ronald Searle, it’s difficult to imagine not liking this best-selling writer and artist. For younger readers there’s simple (very funny), yet strong storytelling with illustrations that reveal something new with each reading.

 

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Imagine A City

By Elise Hurst

Scholastic, $24.95

Bears riding bikes, cultured rabbits who can read, and a flying fish bus are just a few of the magical elements in this intricately illustrated story about two children visiting an extraordinary city.

Hurst’s delicate pen and ink drawings set the tone immediately and by the first couple of pages, you know you’ve entered a world full of curious creatures where the extraordinary is ordinary. This is a magical place that’s nostalgic, futuristic and original. The text is simple and open to interpretation and feels more like poetry than a direct ‘story’. I love the feeling the book conveys, you can’t help but imagine it being read by the glow of a lamp, to a little kid tucked up in bed on a wintry night.

 

*Disclaimer: I have the good fortune of knowing Mr Hobbs, and while he’s a delightful person, this has nothing to do with my admiration of Mr Chicken.

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